Profile: Sampa.com

Sampa Corp., Redmond

Founded: Formed in March 2005 by Marcelo Calbucci, who previously spent seven years at Microsoft.

Employees: One

Financing: Self-financed, with plans to attract angel investors in the coming months.

Business: Easy-to-use online tools that allow consumers or
small businesses to build Web sites. About 60 people are testing the
service, with a full release expected next spring

"Today, you have your blog on Blogger, your pictures on Flickr, your
bookmarks on del.icio.us, your parties on Evite — so it is spread all
over the place and you don’t own your piece of the Internet," said
Calbucci. "Everybody else is holding the data for you, so Sampa would
basically give the user the power to control his Web presence the way
he wants."

Web 2.0 definition: "There are two basic things — first is
that users have much more power over what is available on the Internet
and the second thing is that we are finally making use of Web
technologies that exist for more than five years and nobody made great
use of them — AJAX is one example and RSS is another example."

How different than Web 1.0: "It is not so much the technology
as it is a mind shift for Internet users," said Calbucci. "Today, they
are more receptive to Web-based applications. For example, if
Salesforce.com was eight years ago, nobody would have used it because
they didn’t trust the Internet. People are more willing to have their
pictures on the Internet and some of their data backed up on the
Internet."What about Google: "I think Google is doing a lot of
things in stealth mode that they are not showing, but I am sure they
are going to do something in that area," he said. "For me, the biggest
property on Google that would compete with me is Blogger — but it is
not some major confrontation between me and them. My product is more
similar to what Microsoft Office Live is going to be."

The Web 2.0 hype factor: "I am trying not to make too much
hype with what I am doing in relation to Web 2.0 because the phrase by
itself is getting old. People are already tired of hearing about it,"
Calbucci said. "There are a lack of concrete examples of what it means,
but probably in three years from now everyone will understand what this
transition meant."

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